Research

Rising global epidemic

Babies born today are more susceptible to developing a life-threatening food allergy than any other generation. Here are a few facts about the global food allergy epidemic.

2 out of 3 children who develop a food allergy don’t have a parent with one.

1. Gupta RS, et al. Hygiene factors associated with childhood food allergy and asthma. Allergy Asthma Proc. 20162016Nov-Dec37(6):e140-e146.

Amongst food-allergic children, almost 40% develop an allergy to more than one food1

1. Gupta RS, et al. The public health impact of parent-reported childhood food allergies in the United States.
Pediatrics. 2018;142(6):e20181235.

6 million children in the U.S. have a food allergy1
(~2 per classroom)

1. FARE. Food Allergy Facts and Statistics for the U.S. https://www.foodallergy.org/sites/default/files/migrated-files/file/facts-stats.pdf. Accessed November 18, 2018.

Food allergies have more
than doubled over the
last generation1

1. Gupta RS, et al. The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United States.
Pediatrics. 2011;128(1):e9-e17

Early dietary exposure reduced food allergy risk by 81% compared to avoidance1

1. Du Toit G, et al; LEAP Study Team. Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(9):803-813.

Less than 7% of food allergies develop to peanuts alone1,2

1. Gupta RS, et al. The public health impact of parent-reported childhood food allergies in the United States. Pediatrics. 2018;142(6):e20191235. 2. Gupta RS, et al. Prevalence and severity of food allergens amoung US adults. JAMA Network Open. 2019;2(1):e185630.

Food Allergy Protection Plan

Based on landmark scientific studies (LEAP and EAT), and recommendations by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), this revolutionary approach helps protect children from developing a food allergy.*

1. Early introduction

Begin a food allergy protection plan as early as 4-6 months of age (ideally with continued breastfeeding).

2. Diverse diet

Based on excellent safety data, experts advocate diversifying babies’ diets to include the most commonly allergenic foods.

3. Routine feeding

Feed potential allergens multiple times per week from infancy through early childhood.

Global landmark studies

Totally opposite from decades of advice to avoid the foods responsible for food allergies, research now says early and regular dietary exposure to a food, specifically a food often associated with allergies, like peanut, may help reduce the risk of a child developing an allergy to that food.¹

Learning Early About Peanut allergy (LEAP)

2015 THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

Early introduction of peanut to infants 4 - 11 months of age, fed at least three times a week for five years was safe, reduced development of peanut allergy by 81%

1. Gupta RS, et al. Hygiene factors associated with childhood food allergy and asthma. Allergy Asthma Proc. 20162016Nov-Dec37(6):e140-e146.

Enquiring About Tolerance
(EAT)

2015, THE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

Feeding six potentially allergenic foods (peanut, egg, milk, white fish, sesame, and wheat) to healthy, breastfed infants as young as three months of age was safe, reduced food allergy development by two-thirds in those able to feed multiple times a week for three years

Perkin M, et al; EAT Study Team. Randomized trial of introduction of allergenic foods in breast-fed infants. N Engl J Med. 2016;374(18):1733-1743.

Prevention of Egg Allergy in High-Risk Infants with Eczema (PETIT)

2017, THE LANCET

Daily incorporation of egg in the diet of infants as young as four months, plus good skin protection, reduced egg allergy development risk

Natsume O, et al; PETIT Study Team. Lancet. 2017;389(10066):276-286.

Protection Against Allergy Study in Rural Environments (PASTURE)

2014, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY

Infants exposed to an increased diversity of complementary foods (including major commonly allergenic food categories such as nuts, cow’s milk, fish, soy and egg) within the first year of life have a reduced risk of asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy

Roduit C, et al; PASTURE Study Group. J Allergy Clin Immunal. 2014;133(4):1056-1064

Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD)

2017, PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Delaying introduction of cow’s milk products, egg, and peanut beyond the first year of life significantly increased the odds of sensitization to those foods

Tran MM, et al; CHILD Study Investigators. Timing of food introduction and development of food sesitization in a prospective birth cohort. Pediat Allerdy Immunal. 2017;28(5):471-477.

Nwaru, et al.

2014, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY

By 12 months of age, less diversity of foods was associated with increased risk of asthma, atopic asthma, wheeze, and allergic rhinitis

Nwaru, et al. Food diversity in infancy and the risk of the childhood asthma and allergies. J Allergy Clin Immunal. 2014;133(4):1084-1091.

Ierodiakonou, et al.

2016, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Meta-analysis of 146 studies: Early egg or peanut introduction in infants was associated with lower risk of developing an egg or peanut allergy

Ierodiakonou D, et al. Timing of allergenic food introduction to the infant diet and risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. JAMA. 2016;316(11):1181-1192.

Proprietary Research

Only SpoonfulOne is backed by multiple proprietary studies.

Study Objective

To evaluate the effect of a multiprotein food blend on biomarkers of allergic sensitivity.

Methods

450 infants and children (50/50 high vs typical risk)† were fed a multiprotein blend of egg, milk, shrimp, salmon, almond, hazelnut, walnut, peanut, cashew, and wheat. Subjects were fed daily for one year and randomized to multiple proteins, dual proteins, a single protein, or control.

Results

Multiprotein dietary exposure resulted in notable improvements in allergy biomarkers.

Study Objective

To assess tolerability of SpoonfulOne multiprotein Mix-in in an at-home setting

Methods

705 healthy infants randomized to SpoonfulOne Mix-in or placebo, fed daily for 28 days.

Results

SpoonfulOne was well tolerated in an at-home setting. Of the 8803 ingestions of SpoonfulOne, zero infants experienced an allergic reaction.

The most complete food allergy protection system*