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North American Allergy Societies Provide Guidance On Food Allergy Prevention Through Nutrition

February 24, 2022 2 min read

In 2021, the North American Allergy Societies (AAAAI, ACAAI, and CSACI*) released a consensus document based on recently published data indicating, "the strong potential of strategies to prevent the development of food allergy."

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Download the Consensus Recommendation Summary

In addition to providing recommendations covering risk assessment, introduction and regular feeding of the top 9 allergens, as well as maternal diet considerations, the consensus document highlights the important role primary care providers can play in helping families navigate the dramatic shift from avoidance of food allergens to  active, early allergen introduction and routine feeding. They recommend that Pediatricians, “implement talking points surrounding early allergen introduction into all well-child visits, beginning at birth and repeated at age 2, 4, 6, and 9 months." 

WHO

  • All infants, especially those with severe eczema

WHEN 

  • Begin early allergen feeding around 4-6 months of age, based on developmental readiness, when solid foods are introduced
  • Continue feeding allergens routinely after they have been introduced

WHAT 

  • Feed all top 9 food allergens: peanut, egg, cow’s milk, soy, wheat, tree nuts, sesame, fish, and shellfish

Download the North American Allergy Society Consensus Recommendation Summary for additional clinical recommendations and tips for implementing talking points into your patient discussions. You can also sign up for our V.I.Ped eNewsletter to stay up to date on data and guidance as it continues to evolve in this rapidly changing space.

Download the Consensus Recommendation Summary

 

*AAAAI: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; ACAAI: American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; CSACI: Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

 

REFERENCE:

Fleischer DM, Chan ES, Venter C, et al. A Consensus Approach to the Primary Prevention of Food Allergy Through Nutrition: Guidance from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology; and the Canadian Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2021;9(1):22-43.e4. doi:10.1016/j.jaip.2020.11.002
 

 



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